Dempster’s keeps it naughty with ‘Morning Quickie’

Dempster’s is hoping to catch the internet’s attention with its new “morning quickie” online video. The spot, created by Cundari with Untitled Films, shows a conservatively dressed woman who pulls off a script full of double-entendres and Dempster’s English muffins and bagels. The spot was posted last week and has received 550,000+ views on YouTube […]

Dempster’s is hoping to catch the internet’s attention with its new “morning quickie” online video.

The spot, created by Cundari with Untitled Films, shows a conservatively dressed woman who pulls off a script full of double-entendres and Dempster’s English muffins and bagels. The spot was posted last week and has received 550,000+ views on YouTube since then.

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The concept came from the client’s insight that Canadians believe breakfast sandwiches take too much time to make.

After learning that Dempster’s called the sandwich in the ad a “morning quickie,” Andrew Simon, chief creative officer at Cundari, said his team decided to “embrace it, not run away from it.

“It’s easy to play it safe. Sometimes as marketers it’s our duty to say it’s okay to have some fun sometimes. We can take some chances, and if we’re smart about it it will pay off.”

Cundari also made a point to make sure the video was informative, taking advantage of longer YouTube viewing times to go through the recipe step by step.

This isn’t the first time Dempster’s has skewed its marketing to the sexier side of things. In February it launched an online contest to cater to those consumers interested in steamy romance novels.

The agency has found success with online videos for multiple clients, including its BMW “Bullet” spot, which has over 5 million views. “We’ve been successful with our videos. We’ve learned a lot as we’ve gone on,” says Simon, adding that they’ve discovered restraint works best online.

“It’s basically less is more. We don’t want to oversell and repeat the name of the product six times. We want people to not feel encumbered by the messaging. If we’re entertaining, engaging, and interesting enough, that will take care of itself.”

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