Study suggests fewer than half of Canadians showrooming

Showrooming – the practice of visiting a physical store to check prices and products before buying them elsewhere or online – has become a problem for retailers in the smartphone age. But a recent study suggests most Canadian smartphone users aren’t doing it. The study, done by International Data Corporation Canada, surveyed 582 Canadians with […]

Showrooming – the practice of visiting a physical store to check prices and products before buying them elsewhere or online – has become a problem for retailers in the smartphone age. But a recent study suggests most Canadian smartphone users aren’t doing it.

The study, done by International Data Corporation Canada, surveyed 582 Canadians with smartphones between March 17 and March 23. It found that 46% or respondents had checked the price of a product in-store against other retailers.

“The rate of smartphone adoption has been quickening, and with the rate of adoption comes this comfortability with using the phone for more and more things,” says Leslie Hand, research director of IDC retail insights, adding that retailers have played a role as well. “We’ve seen a lot of investments from the retail side in Canada in terms of building up e-commerce and mobile capabilities, so they’re giving the consumer that opportunity to have this richer shopping journey with many more stops along the way.”

By The Numbers

While the IDC study suggests showroom is not yet the norm, it did find that smartphones are used in a variety of ways throughout the retail experience. Among the study’s participants…

61%

Had used their smartphone to look up a store’s location or hours

69%

Had downloaded at least one shopping app

54%

Had typed in a shopping list and checked it

73%

Had used their smartphone to call, text or message someone while shopping to ensure they were making the right purchase

66%

Sent someone a photo they’d taken of an item

35%

Looked up product information on their phone instead of asking an employee

28%

Scanned a QR code in the store

“Given the time they have been around, the use of QR codes in the retail environment has been a disappointment so far,” says Tony Olvet, group vice-president of research at IDC Canada.

The American Example

American shoppers are more likely to embrace the smartphone shopping experience. In a U.S. study done by IDC over the Christmas shopping season, 70% of respondents said they check prices on their phones, and 53% looked for deals. It also found one in five shoppers purchased an item from elsewhere on their phone – while still in the store. In the U.S., the most popular shopping apps are Amazon, eBay and Groupon. (The info on the most popular apps for Canadians wasn’t available at press time.)

“I’ve been saying for a couple of years now that Canadian retailers were a couple of years behind their colleagues in the States, because mobile adoption was about two years ahead,” says Hand, adding that the survey “demonstrates that mobile has come to Canada.”

Brands Articles

Diageo’s ‘Crown on the House’ brings tasting home

After Johnnie Walker success, Crown Royal gets in-home mentorship

Survey says Starbucks has best holiday cup

Consumers take sides on another front of Canada's coffee war

KitchenAid embraces social for breast cancer campaign

Annual charitable campaign taps influencers and the social web for the first time

Heart & Stroke proclaims a big change

New campaign unveils first brand renovation in 60 years

Best Buy makes you feel like a kid again

The Union-built holiday campaign drops the product shots

Volkswagen bets on tech in crisis recovery

Execs want battery-powered cars, ride-sharing to 'fundamentally change' automaker

Simple strategies for analytics success

Heeding the 80-20 rule, metrics that matter and changing customer behaviors

Why IKEA is playing it up downstairs

Inside the retailer's Market Hall strategy to make more Canadians fans of its designs

Metrolinx launches public education campaign

New campaign from Grey intends to drive awareness of approximately 500 projects