Mercedes-Benz Canada targets Super Bowl tweeters

Does the touchdown stand? That’s the innocent—and timely—question Mercedes-Benz Canada posed in a clever Vine targeted at Twitter users watching the Super Bowl. The Vine video, complete with hashtags from #MercedesBenz to #Gridiron and #Touchdown, was a nod to the big game and features a lone pass on a football field. The text posted with […]

Does the touchdown stand? That’s the innocent—and timely—question Mercedes-Benz Canada posed in a clever Vine targeted at Twitter users watching the Super Bowl.

The Vine video, complete with hashtags from #MercedesBenz to #Gridiron and #Touchdown, was a nod to the big game and features a lone pass on a football field. The text posted with the clip reads “Play under review. Does the touchdown stand?”

The football Vine is part of a new partnership between Twitter Canada and Mercedes-Benz Canada.

Mercedes-Benz Canada interactive marketing supervisor Kelly Seawright said the company has only started using Vine quite recently. Its first two Vines—posted last October and December—supported the launch of the 2014 CLA and the related “Unleash” campaign.

The newest Vine was created by Ben Grant (pictured below) in collaboration with automaker’s digital agency, Kenna, which made the mini-stadium set by hand.

Seawright said Mercedes-Benz Canada wanted to engage with fans during Super Bowl in non-traditional ways. The content helped generate awareness among new audiences. Much of that awareness was gained by using Twitter’s new targeting capabilities, she added.

Ivan Pehar, senior account executive at Twitter Canada, explained that the luxury car company used “Twitter TV Conversation Targeting” to connect with Twitter users while they were watching the Super Bowl.

This new feature lets marketers promote Tweets to users that are conversing about specific shows, whether or not their brand has a spot running in the show.

In this case of the football Vine, Pehar said the results on the TV Conversation Targeting were three to four times that of traditional promoted tweets that have run on Twitter. This type of targeting allowed Mercedes to reach people who were watching the Super Bowl and talking about the game with timely and relevant content, said Pehar.

OMD handled the media buy for the campaign.

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