Soothing graffiti from Pfizer

Pfizer Canada is encouraging Canadians to prove that love, support and courage can be the most powerful medicines of all with a new viral campaign. The Quebec-based pharmaceutical company has launched a 90-second online film entitled “Graffiti,” which opens with a teenage boy spray-painting on a brick wall in a dark alley. The teen returns […]

Kristin Laird September 15, 2008

Pfizer Canada is encouraging Canadians to prove that love, support and courage can be the most powerful medicines of all with a new viral campaign.

The Quebec-based pharmaceutical company has launched a 90-second online film entitled “Graffiti,” which opens with a teenage boy spray-painting on a brick wall in a dark alley.

The teen returns home and is met by his mother, who looks at him disapprovingly. The boy grabs a vase of flowers sitting on the kitchen counter and walks into another room where a young girl lies in a hospital bed, hooked up to various machines.

He pulls back her curtains and the little girl wakes up to see the the words “Be Brave” painted on the wall, surrounded by colourful flowers. The mother enters the room, sees the painting and mouths the words “Thank you.” The film closes with MoreThanMedication.ca, where the video has been posted.

The video is an extension of the “More Than Medication” campaign Pfizer launched last May, said Veronica Piacek, customer director consumer communications, relations for Pfizer Canada.

“We believe that it takes more than medication to be healthy,” she said. “With this viral campaign, we wanted to encourage Canadians to show that love and support is just as important when helping someone with a serious illness.”

Canadians can spread the message by forwarding the spot to friends and family. Pfizer Canada will donate $5 to its long time charity partner, Starlight Children’s Foundation, every time a recipient views the video, forwards the spot, and the recipient views it. Senders can choose one of six graffiti messages to send along with the film. The site also features expert articles and advice as well as links to local support groups.

“Programs like this help us fund important home and hospital-based programs that brighten the spirits of seriously ill children and their families,” said Laura Mountjoy, executive director, Starlight Children’s Foundation, in a statement. “We hope this short film about courage will also inspire Canadians to reach out to help a family they know to cope with the fear, isolation and pain families face when a child is seriously ill.”

Pfizer is supporting the initiative with online banner ads.

The campaign was developed by Pfizer Canada in collaboration with Zig, interactive agency Klick, MediaCom Canada and Health Connect.